One of the very best things about playing a video game is discovering the story behind it. The feeling you get as you uncover more secrets, start picking up on contextual clues, and eventually putting together all the pieces of a game’s background, is incomparable. Even better, when a game becomes a series, and each installment starts to connect with the last, you know you’re in for something good. Oftentimes I find myself so invested in a game universe’s lore, I end up researching it on my own time, just to learn more.

I know I’m not the only one that’s like this. Gamers crave information about the worlds we put ourselves in, so when official statements from the makers of the games themselves are released, we eat it up like candy. So as we were thinking about gifts that any self-respecting Nintendo fan might want, one book in particular came to my mind.

Hyrule Historia, published by Dark Horse Comics, is a 274 page book filled to the brim with history of The Legend of Zelda, both in the universe and out of it. From concept sketches and scrapped ideas, to an official timeline connecting all of the games in the series, this book is worth owning. I can guarantee any Nintendo fan would love to receive this book for the holidays, and will have a blast looking through it and reading statements and design notes from Shigeru Miyamoto and Eiji Aonuma, who also wrote the book along with Akira Himekawa.

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I can only speak for myself, but I love this book to death. So much, in fact, that I ended up bringing it to college with me. There’s something really satisfying about reading a book about a game series you love, and also feeling like you’re reading a textbook. And while it did come out two years ago, it’s still just as cool as ever. And it’ll only set you back about $20!

Buy Hyrule Historia on Amazon today!

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Written by George Comatas

As a wannabe social media personality and professional in the world of sarcasm, George does his best to always adapt to the changing world around him. He considers himself a maverick: a true-to-heart gamer with the mind of a pop star. Whether this makes him revolutionary or a setback, he's yet to find out. But one thing’s for sure; he's one-of-a-kind.

George Comatas