Previously, Capcom had informed the public that hackers who breached their internal servers had compromised the documents of in-development titles, older releases, financial breakdowns, personal information of both company employees and customers, and much more. The situation appears to be far worse than Capcom initially predicted as their latest third update on the recent security threat continues to bring more bad news to light.

Originally the publisher posted that 350,000 individuals had potentially been compromised by the attack, but that number has since increased by another 40,000. On top of this, Capcom has brought awareness to the fact that a total of 16,415 identified people have definitely had their information stolen. These individuals include business partners, customers, and employees who have owned accounts within the company’s servers.

For customers worried about their credit card information being stolen, Capcom has once again reassured that no such data was included in the attack due to their transactions being held by a third party server. However, Capcom will still continue to investigate this side of the issue out of concern for its customers and will provide any updates immediately if customer transaction-related data has been compromised.

The hacker organization by the name Ragnar Locker was confirmed to have been involved in the attack against the company, however, all parties who stole information from the publisher are still yet to be identified. Until Capcom can provide another update, the publisher will continue to coordinate with law enforcement to solve the critical data breach at hand. Until their next update is released, we will be sure to keep an eye on the issue and report on any new information available.

 

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Written by Marc Kaliroff

Ever since owning a cobalt blue Game Boy Advance, Nintendo is his preferred way of gaming. Marc is a journalist, creative writer, and video producer. While his focus may be on providing news, he spends his days preparing reviews for games of the present and past.

Marc Kaliroff