UPDATE: In a previous version of this article we mistakenly stated Soleil was one of Fire Emblem Fates’ two LGBT characters, but in the game she is actually only available as an S-Support for a male protagonist. We apologize for any confusion!


The English version of Fire Emblem Fates is said to be receiving a bit of censorship in the form of a changed Support Conversation, according to Nintendo World Report.

The Support Conversation in question involves the game’s male protagonist and a character known in the Japanese version of Fire Emblem Fates as Soleil.

During the conversation, Soleil remarks to the male protagonist that she becomes nervous when around women, and fears that, consequently, she cannot be “strong and cool.”

FireEmblem-Soleil

The male protagonist responds to her personal dilemma by spiking her drink with a “magic powder” that will cause her to see men as women and women as men, allowing her to “practice” her presence around women.

As a result of the male protagonist’s “solution,” Soleil eventually proposes to him, stating that, while she fell in love with the female version of him, she became infatuated with him as a male once the magic wore off.

The Support Conversation was regarded as controversial by players of the Japanese version of the game due to the male protagonist drugging a character without their consent, as well as the supposed effectiveness of “gay conversion therapy.”

The English version of Fire Emblem Fates will not include these scenes, although it is unknown if they will be removed entirely or simply altered in some way.

The topic of changing content for a region is nothing new for Nintendo. We delve into the company’s relationship with regional censorship here.

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Written by Daniel Dell-Cornejo

Daniel is an editor at Nintendo Wire. Always with his head in the clouds, he is never apart from his creative thoughts – a blessing for an aspiring fiction writer. As a journalist and lifelong gamer, he aims to provide readers with the very best in Nintendo coverage.

Daniel Dell-Cornejo